Before You Adopt

Things to Consider Before Applying

Please review the pages on our website regarding Greyhounds and the process so you have a working understanding of the breed before proceeding with the application. This, along with educating yourself before and during your adoption process will help ensure a successful and smoother transition to having a grey in your family!

Adopting the Racing Greyhound by Cynthia Branigan is a wonderful resource for beginners.

Also note that there may be Greyhounds available near your home in Florida or other states. Please check the Greyhound Adoption Agency Directory for a Greyhound near you!

RDRP does NOT adopt to homes with children under the age of 7.
Please read the Greyhounds and Children page before applying if you have children age 7+


Please ask yourself:

  • Are you looking for a companion or a decoration?
  • Are you willing and prepared to educate yourself about retired racing greyhounds?
  • Are you looking for a status symbol?
  • Are you getting a dog to act as an ego booster?
  • Are you getting a dog as a child substitute? What will become of the dog if/when you do have children and things are not going so smoothly?
  • Are you in it for the long haul?
  • What happens if you move? If you die?
  • Dogs live 10 – 15 years, are you ready for that commitment?
  • Are you financially able to support a pet?
  • Is the initial adoption cost something you have to save for?
  • Can I afford the food and treats, a bed, food bowls and perhaps even rent or buy a crate.
  • What about monthly heartworm prevention? Will this put a strain on your budget?
  • What if there is an accident or illness requiring costly veterinary care, can you afford it?
  • Are you willing to share your home, yard, and possessions with a pet?
  • Are you willing to let it be near you at all times?
  • Are you home enough?

 

Important Greyhound Specific information

 

  • Greyhounds are not built for endurance and should not be walked hard or great distances.
  • Responsible Greyhound Parents do not let their hounds run free, and this can never be considered with a Greyhound.
  • Your Houndie will need a good walk on a martingale collar lead around your neighborhood or play within a fenced in yard to help keep it and you in good shape.
  • Greyhounds should not go to dog parks as they are thin skinned and can easily be hurt by other dogs.
  • Greyhounds sleep a lot but they also need you with them. A normal working day is usually not a problem, but if you are always the first at the office and the last to leave with your briefcase stuffed full of work a Greyhound is probably not the best choice.
  • If you take night classes, go away frequently on weekends, have an extremely active social calendar, or are constantly driving the kids from one event to another this is too much time away from a Greyhound.
  • If you have a small home a smaller hound is advisable unless you are home a lot. Greyhounds should not be adopted to sit in a crate or home 8 or more hours per day. A sitter or walker would be needed.

 

RDRP  reserves the right to decline any adoption at its discretion.